Again we hear  stories of dumping Medical Waste without care of the consequences.
We need to stand up and be heard. You may choose from many approve methods but sterilize the waste then dispose of it properly.

 

Settlement reached over medical waste spilled from Waimanalo Gulch
By Web Staff
Published: July 10, 2015, 7:17 pm Updated: July 10, 2015, 7:19 pm

Waimanalo Gulch operator, employees indicted on multiple counts

Four years after heavy rains caused medical waste from Waimanalo Gulch Sanitary Landfill to spill into the ocean, a settlement has been reached.

Under the agreement, the government agreed to dismiss all felonies after Waste Management of Hawaii accepted two misdemeanor negligence charges under the Clean Water Act.

The company will also have to pay a $400,000 fine and set aside $200,000 for environmental projects.

Two waste management workers, Joseph Whelan and Justin Lottig, have also agreed to misdemeanor charges of negligent discharge of pollutants and will be fined $25,000 each.

In May 2014, the U.S. Attorney’s office filed an indictment against Waste Management of Hawaii, saying the company lied to health inspectors after bags of blood vials, needles and syringes spilled onto the Leeward coast in 2011.

In a statement, the company said, “We’re very pleased to have this particular chapter of this 2010/2011 story now behind us. This settlement agreement is an important turning point for both Waste Management of Hawaii and our two employees.”

Chuck

How can we expect to raise the level of safety in salons when 4 people are expected to monitor 1400

Daily News Staff

Posted Jul. 5, 2015 at 2:12 AM

Manicures and pedicures are considered among the most accessible forms of pampering. Market studies show that the $7 billion nail industry in the U.S. stayed strong even through the recession.

Concerns about hygiene and workplace safety have shed a light on the dark side of the inexpensive luxury, especially after a recent New York Times series about the plight of salon workers in New York City prompted New York Gov.

Andrew Cuomo to take immediate action. The Times series found instances of unsanitary working conditions, unfair payments to workers and exposure of some workers to potentially hazardous chemicals.

In Massachusetts, salons are regulated by the Board of Registration of Cosmetology and Barbering, a four-member board that is in charge of licenses related to salons and imposing punishments for violations. The board was formed in May after merging three state registration boards for barbering, cosmetology and electrology. The new board is supposed to have six members but has two vacancies. Inspections are done by a separate team of four inspectors who work under the state Division of Professional Licensure.

According to complaint records obtained through a Daily News public records request, the state responded to 17 complaints against salons or salon workers in the MetroWest and Milford area in the past five years in Framingham, Hopedale, Hopkinton, Marlborough, Milford, Natick, Northborough and Wayland.

Inspections are typically done when a new business opens or if the state receives a complaint, according to the Division of Professional Licensure Director Charles Borstel. However, the state tries to do occasional random inspections, he said.

During those visits, inspectors look for unsanitary conditions or any unlicensed practices. Inspectors have the authority to write a ticket on-site if a salon has a violation. Each violation carries a $100 fine.
The Board of Cosmetology and Barbering then has the right to uphold that citation or impose a harsher punishment. If a customer has a complaint about a salon, he or she can fill out a two-page form provided by the Division of Licensure Office of Investigations.

The office gets a lot of frivolous complaints, namely issues that don’t necessarily warrant a visit from a state inspector, such as dissatisfaction with a nail color or a bad haircut at a hair salon. Inspectors clearly identify themselves when they visit a salon, said Borstel.

The response time for complaints depends on their severity, he said. If a customer was physically harmed during a salon visit, inspectors go to the salon as soon as possible.

The Better Business Bureau also receives salon complaints. In the past 12 months, the BBB received 15 complaints against nail salons. Four of the complaints alleged unhygienic conditions. Nearly 50 percent of the complaints the BBB gets about salons tend to be about businesses not honoring Groupons or gift cards, according to Denise K. Nelson, operations manager for the local BBB chapter.

Screen Shot 2014-10-10 at 12.41.05 AM

An interesting article was posted in the Chattanoogan web site about the truth about ‘Pedicure‘.  The only common I have to make in regards to the paragraph of autoclaving implements, is that the implements needs to be put into an Ultrasonic Cleaners, then put into a bag (Bags), and then put into the autoclave.  Also, monitoring the autoclave is important.  We recommend.  How elese would you know if the autoclave is working or not?

Call me if you have any further questions.
Thanks,

Shlomo
1-800-762-1586
ext 215

 

p.s. this is the paragraph in the article I was referring to:

Is it clean?

Sanitation is, first and foremost, the most important thing to look for in your salon. Do you see tools being used that have obviously been used on someone else? Do you see the pedicure chairs being washed, rinsed and cleaned with a product that will kill viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens between each client? Do you see thick filings and clippings from other clients lying on tables, floors or pedicure chairs? Please do not have services here. If your salon is touting  “sterile” implements which have been autoclaved, that does not necessarily mean the salon is clean. Autoclaving instruments really does nothing in a non-sterile field. Some salons throw instruments right into the autoclave without even cleaning them first with soap and water, and the autoclave is improperly maintained. If you see nail dust covering floors and/or work surfaces, you are being exposed to anything the prior clients might be carrying. Find yourself a clean and well maintained salon, with or without an autoclave, as long as the instruments used are being correctly sanitized or they are being disposed of after each client. And don’t be afraid to ask.  A true professional is proud of their sanitation methods and is happy to show you the lengths to which they go to protect you.

A dentist license recently temporarily was suspended because he allegedly did no disinfect surgical instruments in his office.  Also, no evidence that the office was sending out for spore testing which is against CDC recommendation of weekly testing the autoclave.

The easiest and least expensive way to spore test, is to to this …Click To Purchase, you get the result at the end of the cycle.  No need to mail it out, immediate feedback.

Go to this url address to see more of the suspended dentist.

http://www.pennlive.com/midstate/index.ssf/2014/06/suspended_dentist_examined_but.html

Thank you,
Shlomo Savyon
516-283-5535

 

 

A Canadian hospital  was not able to sterilize their instruments due to rust-colored stains found surrounding the surgical tools they were using. It was detected that the steam which was generated by two huge boilers (which they heat hospital and provide heat for the sterilizers) were the cause.

A few factors could have caused staining:

1) The autoclave’s steam trap, which collects excess steam, failed, which sent moisture into the sterilizer.
2) Ironically, laundry detergent is a culprit. The surgical tools are wrapped in clean linen; if the detergent hasn’t been 100-per-cent rinsed, it can cause a teatype stain when subjected to the temperatures and pressure in the autoclave.
3) The boiler’s chemicals, designed to prevent corrosion, can carry over into the steam and cause staining.

More on this issue could be found here:

http://www.leadergost.com/health/Science+steaming/9703278/story.html

How clean is your dental office?  A great article written by Ashley Pero who has worked for ‘Dental Staffing Inc.’

http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2014/02/how-clean-is-your-dental-office.html

 

toddler

With 16 percent of both phones and hands sampled containing E. coli, researchers say a lack of hand-washing, or a bad job doing it–is to blame.

“A UK-wide study of mobile phones planned to coincide with Global Handwashing Day, found that one in six carries fecal matter, probably because their owners are not washing their hands with soap after using the toilet. Researchers said some of the phones were contaminated with E. coli, fecal bacteria that can cause stomach upsets and serious food poisoning such as in the fatal O157 outbreak in Germany in June 2011″ (http://www.medicalnewstoday.com)

For full report, log onto http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/236023.php

SterilizeYourPhone.com

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